Women in Academia

CEW explores the status, satisfaction, and career development of women faculty. Our research has also looked at how women academics use family-friendly policies.

Women of Color Faculty at the University of Michigan: Recruitment, Retention, and Campus Climate. Aimee Cox, ; Assistant Professor, African American and African Studies, Rutgers University Executive Summary 2008. Cox conducted extensive interviews with current and former women of color faculty members at the University of Michigan. Her findings? Their numbers are small; they experience significant annual attrition; they are often called on to perform extra service without compensatory support. Aimee Cox, PhD, 2007-2008 CEW Jean Campbell Research Scholar; Assistant Professor, African American and African Studies, Rutgers University Executive Summary

Tenure Clock, Modified Duties, and Sick Leave Policies: Creating 'A Network of Support and Understanding' for University of Michigan Faculty Women During Pregnancy and Childbirth by Jean Waltman and Louise August – A report of CEW's 2003-2004 web-based survey.

It Isn't Over: The Continuing Under-Representation of Female Faculty, paper presented at AIR, May 18, 2006, Louise August. Further analysis of the employment progression of respondents to the CEW Faculty Work-Life Study indicates disparities in tenure attainment, promotion and attrition between male and female faculty.

Attrition Among Female Tenure-Track Faculty, paper presented at AIR, May 18, 2006, Louise August. Based on CEW's Faculty Work Life Study. A series of logistic regressions was conducted to examine faculty attrition using actual departure rather than self-reported departure intentions. The findings suggest that women experience their academic careers differently from men, and that different factors contribute to their decisions to leave.